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Chungnam National University > College of Engineering > Division of Aerospace · Naval Architecture & Ocean Engineering

 

 

 Osborne Reynolds (1842-1912)

 


Osborne Reynolds was born on 23 Aug. 1842 at Belfast, Ireland
and passed away on 21 Feb. 1912, at Watchet, Somerset, England

 

British engineer, physicist, and educator best known for his work in hydraulics and hydrodynamics. Reynolds was born into a family of Anglican clerics. He gained early workshop experience by apprenticing with a mechanical engineer, and he graduated at Queens' College, Cambridge, in mathematics in 1867. In 1868 he became the first professor of engineering at Owens College, Manchester, a position he held until his retirement in 1905. He became a fellow of the Royal Society in 1877 and received a Royal Medal in 1888.

Though his earliest professional research dealt with such properties as magnetism, electricity, and heavenly bodies, Reynolds soon began to concentrate on fluid mechanics. In this area he made a number of significant contributions. His studies of condensation and heat transfer between solids and fluids brought radical revision in boiler and condenser design, while his work on turbine pumps permitted their rapid development. He formulated the theory of lubrication (1886) and in 1889 developed the standard mathematical framework used in turbulence work. He also studied wave engineering and tidal motions in rivers and made pioneering contributions to the concept of group velocity. Among his other contributions were the explanation of the radiometer and an early absolute determination of the mechanical equivalent of heat. His paper on the law of resistance in parallel channels (1883) is a classic. The "Reynolds stress" in fluids with turbulent motion and the "Reynolds number" used for modeling in fluid flow experiments are named for him.

Reynolds number:
in fluid mechanics, a criterion of whether fluid (liquid or gas) flow is absolutely steady (streamlined, or laminar) or on the average steady with small unsteady fluctuations (turbulent). Whenever the Reynolds number is less than about 2,000, flow in a pipe is generally laminar, whereas, at values greater than 2,000, flow is usually turbulent. Actually, the transition between laminar and turbulent flow occurs not at a specific value of the Reynolds number but in a range usually beginning between 1,000 to 2,000 and extending upward to between 3,000 and 5,000.